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Tom + Will

The King’s Singers and Fretwork

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Tom + Will - The King’s Singers and Fretwork
Tom & Will - The King’s Singers and Fretwork

400 years ago, in 1623, England lost two of its greatest composers: William Byrd and Thomas Weelkes. In a programme marking this double anniversary, The King’s Singers and Fretwork turn their focus to the bold personalities of these two men, Tom and Will. Featuring well-known gems by the two composers, alongside works which had never been recorded before and which are rarely heard live, Tom + Will unlocks some of the humanity behind these two giants of Elizabethan music. This programme is filled with beauty, drama and storytelling.

As part of this project, The King’s Singers and Fretwork commissioned two new works for their joint forces by two of Britain’s great living composers: Sir James MacMillan and Roderick Williams. These works represent a commitment to keeping the spirit of Byrd and Weelkes alive in today’s musical landscape.

Gramophone:

“It’s a lovely pairing: Fretwork all rasp and twist and tremor, a consort tone of plunging, vertical depth, against the smooth blend and polished horizontal lines of The King’s Singers” 

Find out more about Tom + Will and buy a copy at Signum Records.

This project was supported by a grant from Continuo Foundation

Supported by Continuo Foundation

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